Category: Race & Gender

Prisons — Depends On Where You Stand: Glenn Kaiser Interviews UPLC’s Alan Mills

I’m cameraman and video editor, neither job being my primary skill set, in this Glenn Kaiser interview of activist prison lawyer Alan Mills. Both men are my friends, and both forgive me. Bonus: music written by Glenn and myself (lyrics) at the tail end. More information about Alan’s organization, Uptown People’s Law Center. And, to visit Glenn Kaiser‘s site. The […]

Read more ›
Evangelical Christianity and White Tribalism: The Strange Case of Jonathan David Brown

Evangelical Christianity and White Tribalism: The Strange Case of Jonathan David Brown

Jonathan David Brown, grammy-nominated (twice) Christian music producer, died suddenly September 27, 2016, of an apparent heart attack. He was sixty years old. His face book pages (this and this) and a gofundme page are filling with condolences from some of the many well-known artists he worked with creatively. But his death also brings into focus a tangled, extremist legacy of […]

Read more ›
“Blood Dried in the Sun”: Four Novelists on Being Black and Dealing with Police

“Blood Dried in the Sun”: Four Novelists on Being Black and Dealing with Police

Violence against blacks by police. Yesterday, one black man murdered in Minnesota and one murdered in Louisiana. Many yesterdays here in Chicago. Not a time to hear my own white male voice. Where race is concerned this is doubly true. I thought I’d simply post four black novelists’ words here instead. Need it be said that black fiction is often truer […]

Read more ›
Death in the Family: Robert Jones’ “The End of White Christian America” Finds the Body, Explores Some Clues

Death in the Family: Robert Jones’ “The End of White Christian America” Finds the Body, Explores Some Clues

Robert P. Jones’ new book begins with a chapter entitled “An Obituary for White Christian America.” And it doesn’t get better from there. But his premise is driven home even for those of us who’d rather be in denial about the demise of our beloved subculture. Architecture hardly seems a promising genesis point for the topic, but by giving both mainstream […]

Read more ›
#NRADeathSquads

#NRADeathSquads

  ‪#‎NRADeathSquad‬ by Jon Trott Easy enough to conceal who you are with the hip-carried friend Sending someone else far away from this place, this life, their universe of time and rhyme gone — snap — watch it congeal on the sidewalk near Leland and Malden I heard the bang-bang-bang-bang-bang And the girl start screaming that they shot her baby […]

Read more ›
Men Typing Badly: Reflections on Male to Female Interactions on Social Media (and maybe elsewhere)

Men Typing Badly: Reflections on Male to Female Interactions on Social Media (and maybe elsewhere)

Professor of Philosophy Adriel Trott, who as a sideline happens to be my niece, is very patient with me and my continual dialogue regarding feminism. Patience is needed, because while I find myself still hashing out what Second Stage feminists fought through, Dr. Trott and her compatriots are post-Third Stage pioneers re gender identity, intersectionality, and ever so much more. […]

Read more ›

Happy 60th Birthday, Ruby Bridges! A Civil Rights Child Hero remembers….

Read more ›

Black Writers Who Mean Something to Me, part 1

The fact that African American history, culture, and especially literature means so much to me can be (and probably should be) cause for suspicion. But rather than in futility attempt to submerge into my own motives (and the motives for those motives, and the motives for the motives of those motives), I’d like to offer some quotes (and maybe, maybe […]

Read more ›
The Bee in Every Blossom (for Zora Neale Hurston) – Black Writers, part 2

The Bee in Every Blossom (for Zora Neale Hurston) – Black Writers, part 2

I promised I’d try to do better by African American women in the literature department. And in the process, I seem to have rediscovered an incredibly powerful voice that for me may end up a star in my personal galaxy. I’d seen the movie of Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God and also read various bits of her […]

Read more ›
Black Writers Who Mean Something to Me, part 3

Black Writers Who Mean Something to Me, part 3

I’m taking my time getting back to the novelists. Today, I’m swinging back to one of, if not the, first African-American poet, Phillis Wheatley. Phillis Wheatley’s name, as with so many slave names, unintentionally mapped her history. Phillis was the name of the slave ship that brought her to America; she was only (according to her eventual owner in a […]

Read more ›